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Common causes of slip-and-fall accidents in office buildings

If you work in an office building, you’re not likely to have many concerns about your safety and well-being. However, just because you work in a relatively stable environment doesn’t mean you can’t suffer an injury.

Slip-and-fall accidents in office buildings are all too common. Here are some of the many causes:

  • Wet floors: There are many reasons why a floor may become wet, ranging from rain water tracked in from outside to a recent cleaning. A wet floor is a slippery floor, so adequate notice must be given.
  • Excessive use of polish or wax: Even if a small amount of polish or wax is applied, it can still result in a slippery surface. Just the same as a wet spot, the display of warning signs is a must after the application of polish or wax.
  • Uneven surfaces: For example, if there’s an abnormally uneven surface between hard flooring and carpet, the transition can act as a trip hazard.
  • Carpet bulges or tears: Carpet has the potential to wear out over time, thus resulting in bulges, tears and worn spots. All of these conditions can catch your foot, which increases the risk of a slip-and-fall injury.
  • Debris: From a soda can to a newspaper, you never know what will end up on the ground. Any type of debris, no matter how small, can act as a trip hazard.

In addition to the above, stairs are among the most dangerous areas of any office building. Here are some conditions that can result in an accident:

  • Missed steps
  • Rounded steps
  • Cracked or damaged steps
  • Missing, broken or loose handrails
  • Use of polish or wax on the steps

Just the same as stairways, escalators and elevators transport individuals from floor to floor. Common causes of accidents include:

  • Jerking
  • Transition changes between the elevator or escalator and floor
  • Clothing, footwear, hands, fingers or feet getting caught in the machinery

If you suffer a slip-and-fall accident in an office building, stay where you are and call for help. Also, report the incident to your employer and the owner of the building.

As you recover, learn more about your ability to receive workers’ compensation benefits or possibly file a personal injury claim.

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